A Reexamination of the Role of Heredity in Stuttering In the light of recent breakthroughs in the study of schizophrenia indicating a far stronger genetic factor than has been previously suspected, the role of heredity in stuttering is critically reexamined. Present knowledge of the role of heredity in stuttering springs from four principal data sources: (1) studies of familial ... Articles
Articles  |   February 01, 1977
A Reexamination of the Role of Heredity in Stuttering
 
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Articles   |   February 01, 1977
A Reexamination of the Role of Heredity in Stuttering
Journal of Speech and Hearing Disorders, February 1977, Vol. 42, 47-59. doi:10.1044/jshd.4201.47
History: Received October 7, 1974 , Accepted July 1, 1976
 
Journal of Speech and Hearing Disorders, February 1977, Vol. 42, 47-59. doi:10.1044/jshd.4201.47
History: Received October 7, 1974; Accepted July 1, 1976

In the light of recent breakthroughs in the study of schizophrenia indicating a far stronger genetic factor than has been previously suspected, the role of heredity in stuttering is critically reexamined. Present knowledge of the role of heredity in stuttering springs from four principal data sources: (1) studies of familial incidence; (2) spontaneous recovery studies; (3) twin studies; and (4) studies of parental disfluency. It is hypothesized that the 4:1 sex ratio in stuttering may be the product of selective genetic factors. Critical examination of earlier and more recent studies leads to substantial evidence that a familial predisposing factor exists in about 25% of cases of stuttering.

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