Reliability of Monosyllabic Discrimination Tests in White Noise for Differentiating Among Hearing Aids In spite of criticism, monosyllabic discrimination tests are widely employed for hearing aid selection. The current study was designed to investigate the following questions: (1) How reliable is aided speech discrimination of monosyllables in a background of white noise? (2) Can differences among hearing aids be reliably demonstrated by measuring ... Articles
Articles  |   November 01, 1976
Reliability of Monosyllabic Discrimination Tests in White Noise for Differentiating Among Hearing Aids
 
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Article Information
Articles   |   November 01, 1976
Reliability of Monosyllabic Discrimination Tests in White Noise for Differentiating Among Hearing Aids
Journal of Speech and Hearing Disorders, November 1976, Vol. 41, 464-476. doi:10.1044/jshd.4104.464
History: Received July 25, 1975 , Accepted October 21, 1975
 
Journal of Speech and Hearing Disorders, November 1976, Vol. 41, 464-476. doi:10.1044/jshd.4104.464
History: Received July 25, 1975; Accepted October 21, 1975

In spite of criticism, monosyllabic discrimination tests are widely employed for hearing aid selection. The current study was designed to investigate the following questions: (1) How reliable is aided speech discrimination of monosyllables in a background of white noise? (2) Can differences among hearing aids be reliably demonstrated by measuring intelligibility of monosyllables in a background of white noise? and (3) Do hearing aids interact with hearing loss? Twenty subjects with mild-moderate sensorineural hearing losses participated in two experimental sessions. Four hearing aids were evaluated using the NU-6 monosyllables in a background of white noise (s/n = +20 dB). Since the standard deviation of the test-retest differences was 6%, differences between aids were not considered significant unless they exceeded 12%. An interaction between subjects and hearing aids was found; that is, the best aid for one person was not the best for all. Measuring monosyllabic word intelligibility in a background of white noise does not reliably identify a single best aid. However, one or more inferior aids were consistently eliminated in 80% of the subjects.

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