The Modification of Multiple Articulation Errors Based on Distinctive Feature Theory The effectiveness of articulation remediation procedures based on distinctive feature theory was evaluated through the administration of an articulation program designed for this purpose. Two preschool children with multiple phoneme errors which could be described by a distinctive feature analysis were the subjects. Both children substituted stop phonemes for most ... Articles
Articles  |   May 01, 1976
The Modification of Multiple Articulation Errors Based on Distinctive Feature Theory
 
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Article Information
Articles   |   May 01, 1976
The Modification of Multiple Articulation Errors Based on Distinctive Feature Theory
Journal of Speech and Hearing Disorders, May 1976, Vol. 41, 199-215. doi:10.1044/jshd.4102.199
History: Received October 17, 1974 , Accepted July 1, 1975
 
Journal of Speech and Hearing Disorders, May 1976, Vol. 41, 199-215. doi:10.1044/jshd.4102.199
History: Received October 17, 1974; Accepted July 1, 1975

The effectiveness of articulation remediation procedures based on distinctive feature theory was evaluated through the administration of an articulation program designed for this purpose. Two preschool children with multiple phoneme errors which could be described by a distinctive feature analysis were the subjects. Both children substituted stop phonemes for most continuant phonemes. Each child was individually administered the distinctive feature program which is described in full. Data are presented which indicate the adequacy of. the treatment program, the acquisition of correct articulation of the two directly treated target phonemes, and the concurrent improvement of five other nontreated error phonemes. Such across-phoneme generalization was predicted by distinctive feature theory. Certain modifications in the treatment program are suggested and theoretical/empirical questions regarding articulation remediation from a distinctive features viewpoint are discussed.

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