The Phonological Systems of Deaf Children Samples of a group of deaf children’s spontaneous speech were used to derive phonological rules. The predictive value of some of the rules was assessed by asking another group of deaf children to lip-read and read nonsense words. The results indicated that the phonological systems of profoundly deaf children are ... Articles
Articles  |   May 01, 1976
The Phonological Systems of Deaf Children
 
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Article Information
Articles   |   May 01, 1976
The Phonological Systems of Deaf Children
Journal of Speech and Hearing Disorders, May 1976, Vol. 41, 185-198. doi:10.1044/jshd.4102.185
History: Received February 10, 1975 , Accepted July 9, 1975
 
Journal of Speech and Hearing Disorders, May 1976, Vol. 41, 185-198. doi:10.1044/jshd.4102.185
History: Received February 10, 1975; Accepted July 9, 1975

Samples of a group of deaf children’s spontaneous speech were used to derive phonological rules. The predictive value of some of the rules was assessed by asking another group of deaf children to lip-read and read nonsense words. The results indicated that the phonological systems of profoundly deaf children are partially rule-governed. There was also some evidence which suggested that lipreading was a major input to the deaf children’s phonological systems.

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