The Use of Auditory Masking to Estimate Automatization of Correct Articulatory Production In order to estimate automatization of correct articulatory production in 71 elementary school children about to be dismissed from training, auditory masking was used during administration of the Deep Test of Articulation. White noise was presented binaurally at 86 dB SPL. The children’s articulation was tested under three conditions: Condition ... Articles
Articles  |   May 01, 1976
The Use of Auditory Masking to Estimate Automatization of Correct Articulatory Production
 
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Article Information
Articles   |   May 01, 1976
The Use of Auditory Masking to Estimate Automatization of Correct Articulatory Production
Journal of Speech and Hearing Disorders, May 1976, Vol. 41, 143-149. doi:10.1044/jshd.4102.143
History: Received March 27, 1975 , Accepted June 14, 1975
 
Journal of Speech and Hearing Disorders, May 1976, Vol. 41, 143-149. doi:10.1044/jshd.4102.143
History: Received March 27, 1975; Accepted June 14, 1975

In order to estimate automatization of correct articulatory production in 71 elementary school children about to be dismissed from training, auditory masking was used during administration of the Deep Test of Articulation. White noise was presented binaurally at 86 dB SPL. The children’s articulation was tested under three conditions: Condition I without masking, Condition II with masking, and Condition III without masking three to four months after Condition II testing. Children’s performances on Conditions I and II were compared with their performances during Condition III. Results demonstrated that performance on the Deep Test during auditory masking as a criterion for dismissal would have resulted in children being correctly dismissed from therapy more of the time (94%) than the traditional (nonmasked) administration of the test (77%). In addition, use of experimental administration of the test would have resulted in 6% of the children being incorrectly dismissed from therapy while traditional administration would have resulted in 23% of the children being incorrectly dismissed. Clinical importance and implications for further investigation are discussed.

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