Analysis of a Father’s Speech to his Language-Learning Child This study analyzed the speech of a father to his language-learning child. Father-to-child speech was taped daily over a two-week period when the child was three years old. Results indicated that declarative (35%) and interrogative (34%) sentences occurred most often. Smaller percentages of exclamatory (9%) and imperative (6%) sentences were ... Clinical Exchange
Clinical Exchange  |   November 01, 1975
Analysis of a Father’s Speech to his Language-Learning Child
 
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Article Information
Clinical Exchange   |   November 01, 1975
Analysis of a Father’s Speech to his Language-Learning Child
Journal of Speech and Hearing Disorders, November 1975, Vol. 40, 524-537. doi:10.1044/jshd.4004.524
History: Received July 24, 1974 , Accepted April 5, 1975
 
Journal of Speech and Hearing Disorders, November 1975, Vol. 40, 524-537. doi:10.1044/jshd.4004.524
History: Received July 24, 1974; Accepted April 5, 1975

This study analyzed the speech of a father to his language-learning child. Father-to-child speech was taped daily over a two-week period when the child was three years old. Results indicated that declarative (35%) and interrogative (34%) sentences occurred most often. Smaller percentages of exclamatory (9%) and imperative (6%) sentences were found. The father rarely repeated his own utterances and almost never expanded his daughter’s utterances. The child rarely immediately imitated her father’s utterances. Comparisons are made of aspects of father-to-child speech with mother-to-child speech as reported in previous investigations.

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