Auditory-Visual Perception of Speech Hearing-impaired persons usually perceive speech by watching the face of the talker while listening through a hearing aid. Normal-hearing persons also tend to rely on visual cues, especially when they communicate in noisy or reverberant environments. Numerous clinical and laboratory studies on the auditory-visual performance of normal-hearing and hearing-impaired children ... Articles
Articles  |   November 01, 1975
Auditory-Visual Perception of Speech
 
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Article Information
Articles   |   November 01, 1975
Auditory-Visual Perception of Speech
Journal of Speech and Hearing Disorders, November 1975, Vol. 40, 481-492. doi:10.1044/jshd.4004.481
History: Received December 12, 1974 , Accepted April 15, 1975
 
Journal of Speech and Hearing Disorders, November 1975, Vol. 40, 481-492. doi:10.1044/jshd.4004.481
History: Received December 12, 1974; Accepted April 15, 1975

Hearing-impaired persons usually perceive speech by watching the face of the talker while listening through a hearing aid. Normal-hearing persons also tend to rely on visual cues, especially when they communicate in noisy or reverberant environments. Numerous clinical and laboratory studies on the auditory-visual performance of normal-hearing and hearing-impaired children and adults demonstrate that combined auditory-visual perception is superior to perception through either audition or vision alone. This paper reviews these studies and provides a rationale for routine evaluation of auditory-visual speech perception in audiology clinics.

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