Cultural Influences in the Development and Treatment of Stuttering: A Preliminary Report on the Black Stutterer A behavioral analysis of a group of stutterers revealed speech behavioral differences that appeared to be culturally determined. Two general types of stuttering behavioral patterns were differentiated. The stuttering behaviors characteristic of the first pattern were overt repetitions and prolongations with a moderate number of secondary characteristics that were also ... Articles
Articles  |   November 01, 1975
Cultural Influences in the Development and Treatment of Stuttering: A Preliminary Report on the Black Stutterer
 
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Article Information
Articles   |   November 01, 1975
Cultural Influences in the Development and Treatment of Stuttering: A Preliminary Report on the Black Stutterer
Journal of Speech and Hearing Disorders, November 1975, Vol. 40, 459-466. doi:10.1044/jshd.4004.459
History: Received August 28, 1974 , Accepted February 7, 1975
 
Journal of Speech and Hearing Disorders, November 1975, Vol. 40, 459-466. doi:10.1044/jshd.4004.459
History: Received August 28, 1974; Accepted February 7, 1975

A behavioral analysis of a group of stutterers revealed speech behavioral differences that appeared to be culturally determined. Two general types of stuttering behavioral patterns were differentiated. The stuttering behaviors characteristic of the first pattern were overt repetitions and prolongations with a moderate number of secondary characteristics that were also overt and of the same relative degree of severity as the prolongations and repetitions. The second pattern was characterized by prolongations and repetitions that were more covert and by a larger number of secondary characteristics that were considerably more severe than the repetitions and prolongations. While 85% of the first pattern, Group I, were white stutterers, 79% of the second pattern, Group II, were black stutterers. These results are explained by important black cultural elements such as (1) the importance of oral skills, (2) the importance of manifesting emotional “coolness,” and (3) the cultural rejection of disfluent speech patterns. The authors believe that, generally, the forces within the black culture tend to be in opposition to currently practiced stuttering treatment procedures.

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