Language in Childhood Psychosis: A Review Childhood psychosis is a group of disorders characterized by numerous behavioral abnormalities, the most significant of which may well be in the area of language. Absence, delay, or deficit in linguistic development are frequently contributing factors to the retardation often associated with childhood psychosis. The literature on language in childhood ... Articles
Articles  |   November 01, 1975
Language in Childhood Psychosis: A Review
 
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Article Information
Articles   |   November 01, 1975
Language in Childhood Psychosis: A Review
Journal of Speech and Hearing Disorders, November 1975, Vol. 40, 439-458. doi:10.1044/jshd.4004.439
History: Received December 10, 1974 , Accepted April 9, 1975
 
Journal of Speech and Hearing Disorders, November 1975, Vol. 40, 439-458. doi:10.1044/jshd.4004.439
History: Received December 10, 1974; Accepted April 9, 1975

Childhood psychosis is a group of disorders characterized by numerous behavioral abnormalities, the most significant of which may well be in the area of language. Absence, delay, or deficit in linguistic development are frequently contributing factors to the retardation often associated with childhood psychosis. The literature on language in childhood psychosis covering the general characteristics of the linguistic deficits, the importance of language in diagnosis and prognosis, mother-child linguistic interaction, and intervention programs is reviewed. Recent psycholinguistic studies in normal development point up the present inadequacies or lack of structural linguistic studies in childhood psychosis. Some assumptions about innate linguistic capacities prerequisite to normal development are discussed and a hypothesis relating to a dysfunction in these capacities in childhood psychosis as well as directions for further research are proposed.

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