The Communication Game: Dump and Play Communication entails much more than formulating a linguistic code to map underlying intents. It entails the utilization of a role-taking attitude in reconciling communicative obstacles that arise from significant speaker-listener discrepancies in form or code, reference or representation, and license or acceptability. Young children communicate in a “talk to” fashion ... Articles
Articles  |   August 01, 1975
The Communication Game: Dump and Play
 
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Article Information
Articles   |   August 01, 1975
The Communication Game: Dump and Play
Journal of Speech and Hearing Disorders, August 1975, Vol. 40, 296-309. doi:10.1044/jshd.4003.296
History: Received June 10, 1974 , Accepted December 17, 1974
 
Journal of Speech and Hearing Disorders, August 1975, Vol. 40, 296-309. doi:10.1044/jshd.4003.296
History: Received June 10, 1974; Accepted December 17, 1974

Communication entails much more than formulating a linguistic code to map underlying intents. It entails the utilization of a role-taking attitude in reconciling communicative obstacles that arise from significant speaker-listener discrepancies in form or code, reference or representation, and license or acceptability. Young children communicate in a “talk to” fashion that essentially is issuing or dumping messages. As role-taking attitudes become acquired, communicative efforts change from merely dumping messages to active resolution of communicative obstacles in an effort to achieve the message of best fit for a particular situation.

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