Relative Intelligibility of the CID Spondees as Presented Via Monitored Live Voice Using three speakers and 75 subjects, a 7.9-dB range in the relative intelligibility of the Central Institute for the Deaf (CID) spondees was found when they were presented via monitored live voice. This range is consistent with previous research and is considered unnecessarily large and detrimental to the efficiency and ... Articles
Articles  |   February 01, 1975
Relative Intelligibility of the CID Spondees as Presented Via Monitored Live Voice
 
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Article Information
Articles   |   February 01, 1975
Relative Intelligibility of the CID Spondees as Presented Via Monitored Live Voice
Journal of Speech and Hearing Disorders, February 1975, Vol. 40, 84-91. doi:10.1044/jshd.4001.84
History: Received June 25, 1974 , Accepted August 26, 1974
 
Journal of Speech and Hearing Disorders, February 1975, Vol. 40, 84-91. doi:10.1044/jshd.4001.84
History: Received June 25, 1974; Accepted August 26, 1974

Using three speakers and 75 subjects, a 7.9-dB range in the relative intelligibility of the Central Institute for the Deaf (CID) spondees was found when they were presented via monitored live voice. This range is consistent with previous research and is considered unnecessarily large and detrimental to the efficiency and precision of the speech reception threshold (SRT) test. The exclusive use of 18 words that have a mean range of 1.5 dB is suggested. The slope of the 36-item spondee articulation function is 12% per decibel and is slightly steeper than previous research using the CID W-l recorded spondees. The slope for the suggested 18-item test is also about 12% per decibel. For the 36-item test the mean speech detection threshold (SDT) was 6.6 dB sound pressure level (SPL) and the mean SRT was 14.2 db SPL. The 7.6-dB difference between the two speech measures is consistent with previous research but the SRT is about 6 dB better than the 20 dB SPL recommended by ANSI 1969. For the suggested 18-item test, the mean SRT was 14.5 dB SPL, which was 7.9 dB above SDT. When the 18-item test is used, average normal hearing can be expected to be about 5.5 dB better than specified by ANSI 1969.

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