Echolalia: Issues and Clinical Applications Echolalic behaviors have been reported within the context of various pathologies but have remained poorly defined. Consequently, it is not easy to determine whether and to what extent normal repetition can be separated from pathological echoing. Hence, it is unclear whether the occurrence of echolalic behavior may be useful for ... Articles
Articles  |   November 01, 1979
Echolalia: Issues and Clinical Applications
 
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Article Information
Articles   |   November 01, 1979
Echolalia: Issues and Clinical Applications
Journal of Speech and Hearing Disorders, November 1979, Vol. 44, 411-434. doi:10.1044/jshd.4404.411
History: Received November 1, 1977 , Accepted January 31, 1979
 
Journal of Speech and Hearing Disorders, November 1979, Vol. 44, 411-434. doi:10.1044/jshd.4404.411
History: Received November 1, 1977; Accepted January 31, 1979

Echolalic behaviors have been reported within the context of various pathologies but have remained poorly defined. Consequently, it is not easy to determine whether and to what extent normal repetition can be separated from pathological echoing. Hence, it is unclear whether the occurrence of echolalic behavior may be useful for differential diagnostic purposes. Also, much room is left for controversies about the clinical management of echolalic behavior. This article reviews the various conditions associated with echolalia and the role of repetitions in normal language behavior. Suggestions are made in terms of the various dimensions along which echolalic behavior should be assessed, as well as of the desirability of particular intervention techniques.

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