Comparison of Regulated-Breathing Versus Abbreviated Desensitization on Reported Stuttering Episodes This study was an investigation of the regulated-breathing method for controlling stuttering as compared to a placebo-control method consisting of abbreviated de-sensitization training. The regulated-breathing procedure, given to 21 stutterers, taught the speaker to breathe smoothly and deeply, to pause at natural juncturing points, to plan ahead for the content ... Reports
Reports  |   August 01, 1979
Comparison of Regulated-Breathing Versus Abbreviated Desensitization on Reported Stuttering Episodes
 
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Article Information
Reports   |   August 01, 1979
Comparison of Regulated-Breathing Versus Abbreviated Desensitization on Reported Stuttering Episodes
Journal of Speech and Hearing Disorders, August 1979, Vol. 44, 331-339. doi:10.1044/jshd.4403.331
History: Received August 28, 1978 , Accepted December 12, 1978
 
Journal of Speech and Hearing Disorders, August 1979, Vol. 44, 331-339. doi:10.1044/jshd.4403.331
History: Received August 28, 1978; Accepted December 12, 1978

This study was an investigation of the regulated-breathing method for controlling stuttering as compared to a placebo-control method consisting of abbreviated de-sensitization training. The regulated-breathing procedure, given to 21 stutterers, taught the speaker to breathe smoothly and deeply, to pause at natural juncturing points, to plan ahead for the content of the speech, and to relax chest and neck muscles. Several general behavioral procedures were also used including relaxation training, self-correction for errors, social support, daily home practice, and response awareness, which are components of the general habit reversal procedure for diverse habits. Training was given in one or two sessions plus regular follow-up telephone calls. Daily self-recordings were obtained of the number of stuttering episodes during everyday speech, to determine the generalized effect of the treatment. The regulated-breathing method reduced the reported stuttering episodes by 94% on the first day after training and by 97% during the fourth week and the three-month follow-up. The control procedure reduced reported stuttering only slightly (about 10%). The results indicate substantial effectiveness of the regulated-breathing method for reducing reported stuttering episodes in everyday speech as compared with an alternative treatment of equal duration.

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