A Study of Some Factors Affecting Generalization of Language Training Two related experiments examined generalization across contexts involving different sentence forms when selected grammatical features were trained within a single syntactic context. Results obtained within a single-subject multiple baseline design showed that training the verbal/auxiliary (contracted with pronoun he) was sufficient to induce its generalization across a variety of verbs, ... Reports
Reports  |   August 01, 1979
A Study of Some Factors Affecting Generalization of Language Training
 
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Article Information
Reports   |   August 01, 1979
A Study of Some Factors Affecting Generalization of Language Training
Journal of Speech and Hearing Disorders, August 1979, Vol. 44, 301-320. doi:10.1044/jshd.4403.301
History: Received September 27, 1977 , Accepted October 31, 1978
 
Journal of Speech and Hearing Disorders, August 1979, Vol. 44, 301-320. doi:10.1044/jshd.4403.301
History: Received September 27, 1977; Accepted October 31, 1978

Two related experiments examined generalization across contexts involving different sentence forms when selected grammatical features were trained within a single syntactic context. Results obtained within a single-subject multiple baseline design showed that training the verbal/auxiliary (contracted with pronoun he) was sufficient to induce its generalization across a variety of verbs, object noun phrases, and a different subjective case pronoun, but not across an objective case pronoun. Similar results were obtained for the uncontractible auxiliary in the past tense. Generalization of the uncontractible auxiliary in the present tense was noted across different verbs; so also was the generalization of contractible copula to different adjectives qualifying the subjective case pronouns he and she (but not in qualifying an objective case pronoun it). Finally, generalization of possessive s inflection across male, female, and animal categories was evident. Trained behavior generalized to home situation in one of the experiments. Some unexpected results also suggest that training on certain forms of either verbal auxiliary or copula may be sufficient to generate correct production of both of them.

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