Some Observations in a Case of Acoustic Neuroma The subject was a 47-year-old male with a moderate asymmetrical sensorineural hearing loss that initially presented cochlear signs except for positive stapedius reflex results. Over the course of only five weeks, he developed the audiological constellation of retrocochlear involvement. The retrocochlear results were confirmed by the removal of an acoustic ... Articles
Articles  |   November 01, 1978
Some Observations in a Case of Acoustic Neuroma
 
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Articles   |   November 01, 1978
Some Observations in a Case of Acoustic Neuroma
Journal of Speech and Hearing Disorders, November 1978, Vol. 43, 459-466. doi:10.1044/jshd.4304.459
History: Received March 30, 1978 , Accepted July 5, 1978
 
Journal of Speech and Hearing Disorders, November 1978, Vol. 43, 459-466. doi:10.1044/jshd.4304.459
History: Received March 30, 1978; Accepted July 5, 1978

The subject was a 47-year-old male with a moderate asymmetrical sensorineural hearing loss that initially presented cochlear signs except for positive stapedius reflex results. Over the course of only five weeks, he developed the audiological constellation of retrocochlear involvement. The retrocochlear results were confirmed by the removal of an acoustic tumor. The results highlight the importance of audiological monitoring and reflex measures in the identification of acoustic neuromas. Several observations provide insight into the apparent relationship between loudness and the stapedius reflex. The findings are discussed with reference to a proposed extension of Borg’s recent theory that elevated reflex thresholds and reflex decay reflect differing degrees of the eighth nerve destruction.

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