Reed-Fistula Speech Following Pharyngolaryngectomy This report describes reed-fistula speech, a surgical-prosthetic approach to speech rehabilitation for patients who have undergone extensive resection of the pharynx in association with total laryngectomy and highlights some characteristics of speech produced by four subjects who use reed-fistula speech as their primary method of oral communication. Observations supported the ... Articles
Articles  |   August 01, 1978
Reed-Fistula Speech Following Pharyngolaryngectomy
 
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Article Information
Articles   |   August 01, 1978
Reed-Fistula Speech Following Pharyngolaryngectomy
Journal of Speech and Hearing Disorders, August 1978, Vol. 43, 401-413. doi:10.1044/jshd.4303.401
History: Received June 20, 1977 , Accepted December 15, 1977
 
Journal of Speech and Hearing Disorders, August 1978, Vol. 43, 401-413. doi:10.1044/jshd.4303.401
History: Received June 20, 1977; Accepted December 15, 1977

This report describes reed-fistula speech, a surgical-prosthetic approach to speech rehabilitation for patients who have undergone extensive resection of the pharynx in association with total laryngectomy and highlights some characteristics of speech produced by four subjects who use reed-fistula speech as their primary method of oral communication. Observations supported the view that the reed-fistula approach provides functionally serviceable speech to patients who have undergone pharyngolaryngectomy. A number of speech and biomedical liabilities associated with this method of speech restoration are delineated. In recognition of these liabilities, reed-fistula speech does not currently merit consideration as a routine approach to speech restoration for all laryngectomized patients. Rather, it is regarded as a potentially promising, experimental approach to speech restoration following laryngeal amputation.

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