Consonant Errors and Remediation in Sensorineural Hearing Loss An analysis of consonant errors for hearing-impaired subjects in a multiple-choice format revealed that about 14 consonants caused most of the difficulty in consonant recognition. For a given consonant, error probability was typically lower in the initial position of the stimulus word than in the final position. When errors were ... Articles
Articles  |   August 01, 1978
Consonant Errors and Remediation in Sensorineural Hearing Loss
 
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Article Information
Articles   |   August 01, 1978
Consonant Errors and Remediation in Sensorineural Hearing Loss
Journal of Speech and Hearing Disorders, August 1978, Vol. 43, 331-347. doi:10.1044/jshd.4303.331
History: Received August 15, 1977 , Accepted March 24, 1978
 
Journal of Speech and Hearing Disorders, August 1978, Vol. 43, 331-347. doi:10.1044/jshd.4303.331
History: Received August 15, 1977; Accepted March 24, 1978

An analysis of consonant errors for hearing-impaired subjects in a multiple-choice format revealed that about 14 consonants caused most of the difficulty in consonant recognition. For a given consonant, error probability was typically lower in the initial position of the stimulus word than in the final position. When errors were made, the substitutions were limited typically to two or three other consonants, with a greater variety occurring for consonants in the final position. Substitutions tended to be the same over a wide range of pure-tone configurations. Place errors were predominant, but manner errors also occurred. In only a few instances did specific relationships occur between particular stimulus consonants and pure-tone configurations. With knowledge of the error consonants and typical substitutions, auditory recognition of consonants can be improved by programmed instruction methods. Shaping can be accomplished by a manipulation of the response foils (choices). Since it has been shown that visual recognition of consonants can also be improved, advantage can be taken of both the visual and auditory modalities in remedial procedures. Frequency of usage in the language should be considered in the ordering of consonants for retraining purposes. Work in consonant recognition should be beneficial to the hearing-impaired patient as part of a total rehabilitation program.

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