Effects of Instructional Set on the Comfortable Loudness Range Ten normal-hearing young adult subjects measured their Comfortable Loudness Ranges (CLRs) using two instructional sets. The first instructional set (range tracking) was similar to the Bekesy Comfortable Loudness tracking method described by Jerger and Jerger (1974). The second instructional set (limit tracking) required the subjects to perform separate trackings of ... Articles
Articles  |   May 01, 1978
Effects of Instructional Set on the Comfortable Loudness Range
 
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Article Information
Articles   |   May 01, 1978
Effects of Instructional Set on the Comfortable Loudness Range
Journal of Speech and Hearing Disorders, May 1978, Vol. 43, 168-172. doi:10.1044/jshd.4302.168
History: Received April 21, 1977 , Accepted July 20, 1977
 
Journal of Speech and Hearing Disorders, May 1978, Vol. 43, 168-172. doi:10.1044/jshd.4302.168
History: Received April 21, 1977; Accepted July 20, 1977

Ten normal-hearing young adult subjects measured their Comfortable Loudness Ranges (CLRs) using two instructional sets. The first instructional set (range tracking) was similar to the Bekesy Comfortable Loudness tracking method described by Jerger and Jerger (1974). The second instructional set (limit tracking) required the subjects to perform separate trackings of each limit (upper and lower) of their CLRs. Results demonstrated a 34.4 dB difference between CLRs for the two instructional sets. The range tracking method yielded the narrowest CLR. Both instructional sets yielded similar upper limits of the CLR, but there was a large (32 dB) difference between the lower limits of the CLR. The results of the present investigation demonstrate the importance of instructions employed in research and clinical measurements of the CLR.

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