Combining Auditory and Visual Stimuli in the Adaptive Testing of Speech Discrimination This investigation determined the feasibility of using both auditory and visual stimuli in the adaptive testing of speech discrimination. Thirty-six adults with normal hearing and vision were subjects. Using the adaptive methodology known as the Doublet technique, speech-discrimination testing using monosyllabic word lists from the Northwestern University Auditory Test No. ... Articles
Articles  |   May 01, 1978
Combining Auditory and Visual Stimuli in the Adaptive Testing of Speech Discrimination
 
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Article Information
Articles   |   May 01, 1978
Combining Auditory and Visual Stimuli in the Adaptive Testing of Speech Discrimination
Journal of Speech and Hearing Disorders, May 1978, Vol. 43, 115-122. doi:10.1044/jshd.4302.115
History: Received March 3, 1977 , Accepted June 6, 1977
 
Journal of Speech and Hearing Disorders, May 1978, Vol. 43, 115-122. doi:10.1044/jshd.4302.115
History: Received March 3, 1977; Accepted June 6, 1977

This investigation determined the feasibility of using both auditory and visual stimuli in the adaptive testing of speech discrimination. Thirty-six adults with normal hearing and vision were subjects. Using the adaptive methodology known as the Doublet technique, speech-discrimination testing using monosyllabic word lists from the Northwestern University Auditory Test No. 6 (NU-6) (Tillman and Car-hart, 1966) was performed at the target levels of 29.3 and 70.7% for both auditory-only and auditory-visual conditions. The results indicated that a specific discrimination score could be obtained under more adverse listening conditions with the addition of visual cues. The contribution of visual cues was constant for the two target scores. The adaptive technique at the 29.3 and 70.7% targets was reliable for both the auditory-only and auditory-visual conditions. Constant level testing showed good agreement with the adaptive technique for the auditory-visual condition. In conclusion, the use of standard error calculations is useful in determining measurement errors and the effects of an aural rehabilitation program.

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