Frequency and Cooccurrence of Vocal Tract Dysfunctions in the Speech of a Large Sample of Parkinson Patients In this study, the frequency of occurrence of speech and voice symptoms in 200 Parkinson patients was defined by two expert listeners from high-fidelity tape recordings of conversational speech samples and readings of the sentence version of the Fisher-Logemann Test of Articulation Competence. Specific phonemes that were misarticulated were catalogued. ... Articles
Articles  |   February 01, 1978
Frequency and Cooccurrence of Vocal Tract Dysfunctions in the Speech of a Large Sample of Parkinson Patients
 
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Article Information
Articles   |   February 01, 1978
Frequency and Cooccurrence of Vocal Tract Dysfunctions in the Speech of a Large Sample of Parkinson Patients
Journal of Speech and Hearing Disorders, February 1978, Vol. 43, 47-57. doi:10.1044/jshd.4301.47
History: Received September 7, 1976 , Accepted March 11, 1977
 
Journal of Speech and Hearing Disorders, February 1978, Vol. 43, 47-57. doi:10.1044/jshd.4301.47
History: Received September 7, 1976; Accepted March 11, 1977

In this study, the frequency of occurrence of speech and voice symptoms in 200 Parkinson patients was defined by two expert listeners from high-fidelity tape recordings of conversational speech samples and readings of the sentence version of the Fisher-Logemann Test of Articulation Competence. Specific phonemes that were misarticulated were catalogued. Other vocal-tract dysfunctions, including laryngeal disorders, rate disorders, and hypernasality, were also recorded. Cooccurrence of symptoms in each patient was tabulated. Examination of the patterns of co-occurring dysfunctions permitted classifying the 200 patients into five groups: Group 1 (45% of the patients) with laryngeal dysfunction as their only vocal-tract symptom; Group 2 (13.5% of the patients) with laryngeal and back-tongue involvement; Group 3 (17% of the patients) with laryngeal, back-tongue, and tongue-blade dysfunction; Group 4 (5.5% of the patients) with laryngeal dysfunction, back-tongue involvement, tongue-blade dysfunction, and labial misarticulations; and Group 5 (9% of the patients) with laryngeal dysfunction and misarticulations of the back tongue, tongue blade, lips, and tongue tip. Disfluencies and hypernasality did not follow a systematic pattern of cooccurrence with other vocal-tract dysfunctions.

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