Self-Perception of Speaking Pitch Levels The literature has noted that speakers often perceive their own speaking pitch levels differently than listeners perceive them. However, little information is available regarding the specific characteristics of such perceptual differences. Speaking pitch level self-perception was explored in a group of 11 young adult males who served both as talkers ... Articles
Articles  |   February 01, 1978
Self-Perception of Speaking Pitch Levels
 
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Article Information
Articles   |   February 01, 1978
Self-Perception of Speaking Pitch Levels
Journal of Speech and Hearing Disorders, February 1978, Vol. 43, 3-8. doi:10.1044/jshd.4301.03
History: Received August 6, 1976 , Accepted May 16, 1977
 
Journal of Speech and Hearing Disorders, February 1978, Vol. 43, 3-8. doi:10.1044/jshd.4301.03
History: Received August 6, 1976; Accepted May 16, 1977

The literature has noted that speakers often perceive their own speaking pitch levels differently than listeners perceive them. However, little information is available regarding the specific characteristics of such perceptual differences. Speaking pitch level self-perception was explored in a group of 11 young adult males who served both as talkers and listeners. As a talker, each subject judged his own speaking pitch level in the process of speaking (live judgments) and during taped replay (taped judgments). The subjects' self-rankings in these two tasks and the rank order of taped voices as judged by listeners were compared to fundamental frequency rankings for the voices. The results indicated that the subjects judged their own taped voices in the same way that the listeners judged them, and the judgments corresponded to fundamental frequency rankings. During the live judgments, the subjects avoided extreme self-rankings, preferring to rank themselves closer to an average pitch level. The findings may have clinical significance in the remediation of certain voice disorders.

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