The Assessment of Pitch Discrimination Ability in Young Children This study tested the hypothesis that some tasks used in assessing pitch discrimination ability may instead be assessing children’s ability to deal with relational language. Five tasks were given to 36 normal children who were equally divided into three age groups, six to six and one-half years, seven to seven ... Articles
Articles  |   May 01, 1977
The Assessment of Pitch Discrimination Ability in Young Children
 
Author Notes
Article Information
Articles   |   May 01, 1977
The Assessment of Pitch Discrimination Ability in Young Children
Journal of Speech and Hearing Disorders, May 1977, Vol. 42, 279-286. doi:10.1044/jshd.4202.279
History: Received July 2, 1975 , Accepted July 7, 1976
 
Journal of Speech and Hearing Disorders, May 1977, Vol. 42, 279-286. doi:10.1044/jshd.4202.279
History: Received July 2, 1975; Accepted July 7, 1976

This study tested the hypothesis that some tasks used in assessing pitch discrimination ability may instead be assessing children’s ability to deal with relational language. Five tasks were given to 36 normal children who were equally divided into three age groups, six to six and one-half years, seven to seven and one-half years, and eight to eight and one-half years of age. Task 1 involved a training procedure to assess the children’s ability to hear the differences in the pitch of two tones, which were an octave apart. A simple motor response was required. Task 2 assessed the children’s ability to label these tones as high or low. Task 3 assessed their ability to compare two tones and label the second as higher or lower than the first. Task 4 examined their ability to label as high or low the position of a man on a ladder. Task 5 examined their ability to compare the positions of two men on two ladders and say whether the second man was higher or lower than the first. Results indicated that children who make pitch discriminations as demonstrated by nearly perfect scores on Task 1 often fail to demonstrate those discriminations on tasks requiring relational language. A comparison of Tasks 2 and 3 to Tasks 4 and 5 suggests that children in the age range studied are less proficient in applying high-low and higher-lower to pitch than to spatial relations.

Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire Journal of Speech and Hearing Disorders content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access