A Communication System for the Severely Dysarthric Speaker with an Intact Language System Two severely dysarthric speakers who had previously spelled entire messages oh an alphabet board were taught a system in which they pointed to the first letter of each word as they spoke. Rate and intelligibility of speech produced with (aided) and without (unaided) the communication system were judged by observers ... Articles
Articles  |   May 01, 1977
A Communication System for the Severely Dysarthric Speaker with an Intact Language System
 
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Article Information
Articles   |   May 01, 1977
A Communication System for the Severely Dysarthric Speaker with an Intact Language System
Journal of Speech and Hearing Disorders, May 1977, Vol. 42, 265-270. doi:10.1044/jshd.4202.265
History: Received May 27, 1976 , Accepted September 2, 1976
 
Journal of Speech and Hearing Disorders, May 1977, Vol. 42, 265-270. doi:10.1044/jshd.4202.265
History: Received May 27, 1976; Accepted September 2, 1976

Two severely dysarthric speakers who had previously spelled entire messages oh an alphabet board were taught a system in which they pointed to the first letter of each word as they spoke. Rate and intelligibility of speech produced with (aided) and without (unaided) the communication system were judged by observers who viewed videotaped samples. The rate of aided and unaided speech was markedly faster than spelling the entire message. Aided speech was slower but more intelligible than unaided speech. Further analysis revealed that intelligibility was influenced by at least two factors: (1) rate and (2) information provided by the identification of the first letter of each word. For one speaker both factors contributed to increased intelligibility, while for the other speaker only initial letter information appeared to influence intelligibility.

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