Instrumental Modification of Hypernasal Voice Quality in Retarded Children: Case Reports A bioelectric system for detecting and measuring voice parameters, The Oral Nasal Acoustic Ratio (TONAR), was used to explore its potential for reducing nasality in three mentally retarded children with hypernasality. All three reduced their hypernasality during a three-week treatment period. Concomitant improvements in speech intelligibility occurred in two of ... Case Reports
Case Reports  |   November 01, 1974
Instrumental Modification of Hypernasal Voice Quality in Retarded Children: Case Reports
 
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Article Information
Case Reports   |   November 01, 1974
Instrumental Modification of Hypernasal Voice Quality in Retarded Children: Case Reports
Journal of Speech and Hearing Disorders, November 1974, Vol. 39, 500-507. doi:10.1044/jshd.3904.500
History: Received June 27, 1973 , Accepted March 29, 1974
 
Journal of Speech and Hearing Disorders, November 1974, Vol. 39, 500-507. doi:10.1044/jshd.3904.500
History: Received June 27, 1973; Accepted March 29, 1974

A bioelectric system for detecting and measuring voice parameters, The Oral Nasal Acoustic Ratio (TONAR), was used to explore its potential for reducing nasality in three mentally retarded children with hypernasality. All three reduced their hypernasality during a three-week treatment period. Concomitant improvements in speech intelligibility occurred in two of the children. While replication studies are definitely warranted, the findings strongly suggest that many educable mentally retarded children do have the potential for modifying their hypernasality and that TONAR appears to have significant clinical potential for such children.

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