Teaching English as a Second Language to Young Deaf Children: A Case Study Examination of a three-year-old deaf girl’s expressive language reveals a diglossic continuum ranging from her own invented and imaginative signs through the language of signs, to those used in English syntactical order without inflections, to those with some English markings, to signed American Standard English. By means of total communication, ... Case Reports
Case Reports  |   November 01, 1974
Teaching English as a Second Language to Young Deaf Children: A Case Study
 
Author Notes
Article Information
Case Reports   |   November 01, 1974
Teaching English as a Second Language to Young Deaf Children: A Case Study
Journal of Speech and Hearing Disorders, November 1974, Vol. 39, 486-499. doi:10.1044/jshd.3904.486
History: Received February 19, 1974 , Accepted April 2, 1974
 
Journal of Speech and Hearing Disorders, November 1974, Vol. 39, 486-499. doi:10.1044/jshd.3904.486
History: Received February 19, 1974; Accepted April 2, 1974

Examination of a three-year-old deaf girl’s expressive language reveals a diglossic continuum ranging from her own invented and imaginative signs through the language of signs, to those used in English syntactical order without inflections, to those with some English markings, to signed American Standard English. By means of total communication, that is, the use of signing, fingerspelling, speech reading, speech, and limited audition via amplification, her language is equivalent to that of her hearing peers.

Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire Journal of Speech and Hearing Disorders content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access