A Preliminary View of Generalization in Language Training Through modeling, eight language-handicapped children were trained in the use of two syntactic structures in an effort to examine the nature and extent of generalization in language training. Comparisons of pre- and posttraining tests revealed that the children had also acquired the use of syntactic structures containing the same morphemes ... Articles
Articles  |   November 01, 1974
A Preliminary View of Generalization in Language Training
 
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Article Information
Articles   |   November 01, 1974
A Preliminary View of Generalization in Language Training
Journal of Speech and Hearing Disorders, November 1974, Vol. 39, 429-436. doi:10.1044/jshd.3904.429
History: Received March 22, 1974 , Accepted April 30, 1974
 
Journal of Speech and Hearing Disorders, November 1974, Vol. 39, 429-436. doi:10.1044/jshd.3904.429
History: Received March 22, 1974; Accepted April 30, 1974

Through modeling, eight language-handicapped children were trained in the use of two syntactic structures in an effort to examine the nature and extent of generalization in language training. Comparisons of pre- and posttraining tests revealed that the children had also acquired the use of syntactic structures containing the same morphemes as those structures trained. No use was seen, however, of syntactically identical structures containing dissimilar morphemes. The children’s ability to apply the trained morphemes appropriately and immediately to new structures suggests that the child’s development from simple to complex constructions is not dependent on his use of basic constructions on which mastery of more complex constructions is predicated. Clinical implications of the findings are discussed, in addition to a hypothesis of the nature of certain children’s language handicaps.

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