Markedness Theory and Articulation Errors Articulation errors of 19 children were subjected to a markedness analysis to determine whether their substitutions consisted of phones that were less complex than the target phonemes with respect to articulatory and perceptual effort. The unit for the analysis consisted of individual distinctive features and distinctive feature bundles. The analysis ... Forum
Forum  |   February 01, 1974
Markedness Theory and Articulation Errors
 
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Forum   |   February 01, 1974
Markedness Theory and Articulation Errors
Journal of Speech and Hearing Disorders, February 1974, Vol. 39, 93-103. doi:10.1044/jshd.3901.93
History: Received July 13, 1973 , Accepted October 24, 1973
 
Journal of Speech and Hearing Disorders, February 1974, Vol. 39, 93-103. doi:10.1044/jshd.3901.93
History: Received July 13, 1973; Accepted October 24, 1973

Articulation errors of 19 children were subjected to a markedness analysis to determine whether their substitutions consisted of phones that were less complex than the target phonemes with respect to articulatory and perceptual effort. The unit for the analysis consisted of individual distinctive features and distinctive feature bundles. The analysis explored changes in features from more complex to less complex and the reverse. The children did not substitute phonemes requiring less effort than the target phoneme consistently. Their substitutions also consisted of phonemes that, according to markedness theory, might be considered to require greater effort than the target phoneme.

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