Persistence of the Open Syllable Reinterpreted as a Symptom of Language Disorder Renfrew in 1966 hypothesized that the “persistent open syllable” (misarticulation or omission of syllable final consonants) was symptomatic of a unique articulation disorder resistant to conventional articulation therapies. Examination of relevant syllable data drawn from the clinical literature suggests a more extensive disorder of phonology and language, in which the ... Forum
Forum  |   February 01, 1974
Persistence of the Open Syllable Reinterpreted as a Symptom of Language Disorder
 
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Forum   |   February 01, 1974
Persistence of the Open Syllable Reinterpreted as a Symptom of Language Disorder
Journal of Speech and Hearing Disorders, February 1974, Vol. 39, 23-31. doi:10.1044/jshd.3901.23
History: Received July 16, 1973 , Accepted August 10, 1973
 
Journal of Speech and Hearing Disorders, February 1974, Vol. 39, 23-31. doi:10.1044/jshd.3901.23
History: Received July 16, 1973; Accepted August 10, 1973

Renfrew in 1966 hypothesized that the “persistent open syllable” (misarticulation or omission of syllable final consonants) was symptomatic of a unique articulation disorder resistant to conventional articulation therapies. Examination of relevant syllable data drawn from the clinical literature suggests a more extensive disorder of phonology and language, in which the syllable grammar is generally simplified through the use of elementary and, according to Jakobson, universal syllable shapes and phonic features. Evidence of “global language deficit” and the need to consider broader-based linguistic approaches to therapy are discussed.

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