Acknowledgment and Severity of Stuttering as Factors Influencing Nonstutterers' Perceptions of Stutterers The purpose of this study was to determine (a) if nonstutterers prefer to interact with mild and severe stutterers who acknowledge their stuttering and (b) if nonstutterers' perceptions of mild and severe stutterers' intelligence, personality, and appearance are altered as a function of stutterers' acknowledgment of their stuttering. Acknowledgment and ... Reports
Reports  |   February 01, 1990
Acknowledgment and Severity of Stuttering as Factors Influencing Nonstutterers' Perceptions of Stutterers
 
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Reports   |   February 01, 1990
Acknowledgment and Severity of Stuttering as Factors Influencing Nonstutterers' Perceptions of Stutterers
Journal of Speech and Hearing Disorders, February 1990, Vol. 55, 75-81. doi:10.1044/jshd.5501.75
History: Received December 5, 1988 , Accepted April 17, 1989
 
Journal of Speech and Hearing Disorders, February 1990, Vol. 55, 75-81. doi:10.1044/jshd.5501.75
History: Received December 5, 1988; Accepted April 17, 1989

The purpose of this study was to determine (a) if nonstutterers prefer to interact with mild and severe stutterers who acknowledge their stuttering and (b) if nonstutterers' perceptions of mild and severe stutterers' intelligence, personality, and appearance are altered as a function of stutterers' acknowledgment of their stuttering. Acknowledgment and nonacknowledgment videotapes of two mild and two severe male stutterers were made during interview situations. Eighty-four female subjects examined the interview tapes and were then instructed to answer questions and complete adjective scales. Findings indicate that significant numbers of female nonstutterers prefer to interact with severe stutterers who acknowledged their stuttering. Mild and severe stutterers who acknowledged their stuttering receive more favorable ratings on intelligence, personality, and appearance.

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