Acoustic Analysis of Voice in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis A Longitudinal Case Study Reports
Reports  |   February 01, 1990
Acoustic Analysis of Voice in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis
 
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Article Information
Reports   |   February 01, 1990
Acoustic Analysis of Voice in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis
Journal of Speech and Hearing Disorders, February 1990, Vol. 55, 2-14. doi:10.1044/jshd.5501.02
History: Received June 3, 1988 , Accepted November 28, 1988
 
Journal of Speech and Hearing Disorders, February 1990, Vol. 55, 2-14. doi:10.1044/jshd.5501.02
History: Received June 3, 1988; Accepted November 28, 1988

Acoustic measures of phonatory instability (coefficient of variation for amplitude, coefficient of variation for frequency, shimmer, jitter, and harmonics-to-noise ratio), phonatory limits (maximum fundamental frequency range and maximum duration of vowel phonation), and the nasal-oral amplitude ratio were measured five times throughout a 6-month period from the phonation of a 69-year-old male patient with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), an age- and sex-matched control subject, and on one occasion from a 16-subject control group matched to the patient in age and sex. The patient was free of vocal symptoms at the initiation of the study. When compared to the other recording sessions, the final recording of the ALS patient was characterized by increased coefficient of variation for amplitude, increased coefficient of variation for frequency, increased shimmer, increased jitter, reduced harmonics-to-noise ratio, and reduced maximum vowel duration. These acoustic manifestations of increased phonatory instability and reduced phonatory limits over time were in contrast to the consistency observed in the phonation of the longitudinal control subject and were outside the range of plus or minus one standard deviation on most acoustic variables when compared to the control group. These findings support the potential use of acoustic analysis in reflecting progression of ALS and suggest the need for further studies to investigate the relationship between acoustic analysis of voice and manifestations of neurological disease.

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