Matching Commercial Hearing Aids to Prescriptive Gain and Maximum Output Requirements Insertion gain and saturation sound pressure level (SSPL) characteristics of 71 behind-the-ear hearing aids were evaluated in a computer-assisted analysis as acceptable matches to prescriptive insertion gain and SSPL values derived by a variation of the Prescription of Gain and Output, or POGO, technique (McCandless & Lyregaard, 1983). Stringency criteria ... Reports
Reports  |   February 01, 1987
Matching Commercial Hearing Aids to Prescriptive Gain and Maximum Output Requirements
 
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Article Information
Reports   |   February 01, 1987
Matching Commercial Hearing Aids to Prescriptive Gain and Maximum Output Requirements
Journal of Speech and Hearing Disorders, February 1987, Vol. 52, 76-83. doi:10.1044/jshd.5201.76
History: Received March 21, 1986 , Accepted July 29, 1986
 
Journal of Speech and Hearing Disorders, February 1987, Vol. 52, 76-83. doi:10.1044/jshd.5201.76
History: Received March 21, 1986; Accepted July 29, 1986

Insertion gain and saturation sound pressure level (SSPL) characteristics of 71 behind-the-ear hearing aids were evaluated in a computer-assisted analysis as acceptable matches to prescriptive insertion gain and SSPL values derived by a variation of the Prescription of Gain and Output, or POGO, technique (McCandless & Lyregaard, 1983). Stringency criteria in a primary analysis varied from ±6 to ±16 dB and ±2 to ±8 dB for gain and SSPL, respectively. Three audiometric contours and associated loudness discomfort levels were used in the simulation. Findings indicated that the relationship between tolerances and the number of aids selected as optimally appropriate varied substantially as a function of audiometric configuration. Minimum gain and SSPL tolerance values of ±12 dB and ±4 dB, respectively, were required to provide a reasonable choice of instruments for a variety of such configurations. Further analyses shed light on the feasibility of using alternative stringency criteria and on the clinical utility of hearing aid selection using small clinic samples.

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