A Home-Centered Instructional Communication Strategy for Severely Handicapped Children Family involvement is an essential element of language intervention with severely handicapped children for several reasons. First, the parent-child interaction is the focus of normal language development, and can be a powerful impetus in language learning for handicapped children. Second, limited generalization and maintenance of skills often occur when they ... Research Article
Research Article  |   February 01, 1983
A Home-Centered Instructional Communication Strategy for Severely Handicapped Children
 
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Article Information
Research Article   |   February 01, 1983
A Home-Centered Instructional Communication Strategy for Severely Handicapped Children
Journal of Speech and Hearing Disorders, February 1983, Vol. 48, 2-10. doi:10.1044/jshd.4801.02
History: Received January 28, 1981 , Accepted October 1, 1981
 
Journal of Speech and Hearing Disorders, February 1983, Vol. 48, 2-10. doi:10.1044/jshd.4801.02
History: Received January 28, 1981; Accepted October 1, 1981

Family involvement is an essential element of language intervention with severely handicapped children for several reasons. First, the parent-child interaction is the focus of normal language development, and can be a powerful impetus in language learning for handicapped children. Second, limited generalization and maintenance of skills often occur when they are acquired in environments that do not also teach the appropriate use of skills. Third, parents can be successful intervention agents and may generalize their skills to other interactions with their child.

Training conducted in the home must be compatible with that environment: it should involve only those skills that are of immediate use in the home. The Instructional Communication Strategy described herein represents such a program. It is a synthesis of training strategies used with normal and handicapped children, and is applicable regardless of child's level of functioning, age, or handicapping condition.

This training model involves considerable modification in the role of speech-language pathologists dealing with the severely handicapped. The professional's skills are best utilized for assessment, program development, monitoring progress, and training specialized skills. The parents provide most of the direct training: however, professionals are also utilized for the child's maximum benefit.

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