Effects of Hearing Levels at the Activator and Other Frequencies upon the Expected Levels of the Acoustic Reflex Threshold Multiple linear regression equations were derived to define the expected levels of acoustic reflex thresholds (ARTs) at 500, 1000, and 2000 Hz predictable from hearing levels as 500–4000 Hz in 646 ears. When the hearing level at the activator frequency is ⩽50 dB HL, ARTs tend to be best defined ... Research Article
Research Article  |   February 01, 1983
Effects of Hearing Levels at the Activator and Other Frequencies upon the Expected Levels of the Acoustic Reflex Threshold
 
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Article Information
Research Article   |   February 01, 1983
Effects of Hearing Levels at the Activator and Other Frequencies upon the Expected Levels of the Acoustic Reflex Threshold
Journal of Speech and Hearing Disorders, February 1983, Vol. 48, 11-17. doi:10.1044/jshd.4801.11
History: Received October 5, 1981 , Accepted January 13, 1982
 
Journal of Speech and Hearing Disorders, February 1983, Vol. 48, 11-17. doi:10.1044/jshd.4801.11
History: Received October 5, 1981; Accepted January 13, 1982

Multiple linear regression equations were derived to define the expected levels of acoustic reflex thresholds (ARTs) at 500, 1000, and 2000 Hz predictable from hearing levels as 500–4000 Hz in 646 ears. When the hearing level at the activator frequency is ⩽50 dB HL, ARTs tend to be best defined by a constant value of 86–90 dB HL with small adjustments due to the loss at the activator or higher frequencies. When the hearing level at the activator frequency is 55–90 dB HL, the ART is best predicted by a constant plus the degree of loss at that frequency plus the loss at 4000 Hz. These data present the clinician with empirically derived bases for determining the effects of other frequencies on a given ART. Application of these findings permits the clinician to apply known relationships in determining whether a particular ART is representative of those expected for normal and/or cochlear impaired ears, elevated or depressed, without having to rely on vague intuitions of such relationships. Clinical applications are discussed.

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