A Binary Articulatory Production Classification of English Consonants with Derived Difference Measures English consonants were classified according to six binary articulatory variables. Differences between the members of each possible consonant pair were quantified and the overall difference between each consonant and all other consonants was calculated. The consonant difference measures were found to be significantly related to children's substitution errors and to ... Reports
Reports  |   August 01, 1980
A Binary Articulatory Production Classification of English Consonants with Derived Difference Measures
 
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Research Issues, Methods & Evidence-Based Practice / Speech, Voice & Prosody
Reports   |   August 01, 1980
A Binary Articulatory Production Classification of English Consonants with Derived Difference Measures
Journal of Speech and Hearing Disorders, August 1980, Vol. 45, 346-356. doi:10.1044/jshd.4503.346
History: Received May 30, 1978 , Accepted February 27, 1980
 
Journal of Speech and Hearing Disorders, August 1980, Vol. 45, 346-356. doi:10.1044/jshd.4503.346
History: Received May 30, 1978; Accepted February 27, 1980

English consonants were classified according to six binary articulatory variables. Differences between the members of each possible consonant pair were quantified and the overall difference between each consonant and all other consonants was calculated. The consonant difference measures were found to be significantly related to children's substitution errors and to account for 56% of the variance in Templin's (1957) data on normal consonant acquisition. Similar measures calculated from the distinctive feature classifications of Chomsky and Halle (1968) and Singh and Singh (1976) accounted for less than one third of this amount. These findings suggest the potential utility of the present classification for the analysis of articulated speech.

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