Consonant and Syllable Harmony in the Speech of Language-Disordered Children The focus of this study was an examination of the functions served by consonant assimilation and reduplication in the speech of eight language-disordered children. The findings suggested that assimilation may have served the function of allowing the children to produce words in a manner enabling them to avoid difficult consonants, ... Reports
Reports  |   August 01, 1980
Consonant and Syllable Harmony in the Speech of Language-Disordered Children
 
Author Notes
Article Information
Reports   |   August 01, 1980
Consonant and Syllable Harmony in the Speech of Language-Disordered Children
Journal of Speech and Hearing Disorders, August 1980, Vol. 45, 336-345. doi:10.1044/jshd.4503.336
History: Received July 23, 1979 , Accepted February 15, 1980
 
Journal of Speech and Hearing Disorders, August 1980, Vol. 45, 336-345. doi:10.1044/jshd.4503.336
History: Received July 23, 1979; Accepted February 15, 1980

The focus of this study was an examination of the functions served by consonant assimilation and reduplication in the speech of eight language-disordered children. The findings suggested that assimilation may have served the function of allowing the children to produce words in a manner enabling them to avoid difficult consonants, while reduplication may have served the function of allowing the children to produce multisyllabic words at a time when they were not yet able to handle the syllable structure of the adult forms of these words. The implications of these findings for lexical and speech sound training are discussed.

Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire Journal of Speech and Hearing Disorders content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access