Intelligibility of Synthetic Speech for Normal-Hearing and Hearing-Impaired Listeners This study examined the perceived intelligibility of synthetic speech. Participants were adults aged 49–69, one group with normal hearing and one group with acquired sensorineural hearing impairment. Word lists were presented in two speech types: DECtalk (a high-quality speech synthesizer) and a natural male speaker. Results revealed differences between groups, ... Research Article
Research Article  |   November 01, 1990
Intelligibility of Synthetic Speech for Normal-Hearing and Hearing-Impaired Listeners
 
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Article Information
Research Article   |   November 01, 1990
Intelligibility of Synthetic Speech for Normal-Hearing and Hearing-Impaired Listeners
Journal of Speech and Hearing Disorders, November 1990, Vol. 55, 751-755. doi:10.1044/jshd.5504.751
History: Accepted February 12, 1989 , Received July 14, 1989
 
Journal of Speech and Hearing Disorders, November 1990, Vol. 55, 751-755. doi:10.1044/jshd.5504.751
History: Accepted February 12, 1989; Received July 14, 1989

This study examined the perceived intelligibility of synthetic speech. Participants were adults aged 49–69, one group with normal hearing and one group with acquired sensorineural hearing impairment. Word lists were presented in two speech types: DECtalk (a high-quality speech synthesizer) and a natural male speaker. Results revealed differences between groups, with normal-hearing listeners scoring higher than hearing-impaired listeners, and between speech types, with higher scores for natural speech than for synthesized speech. There was no significant interaction of hearing level and speech type.

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