The Relationship between Communication Problems and Psychological Difficulties in Persons with Profound Acquired Hearing Loss Communication strategies, accommodations to deafness, and perceptions of the communication environment by profoundly deaf subjects were correlated with indices of psychosocial adjustment to determine whether accommodations to deafness could play a role in the presence of psychological difficulties among deaf persons. Persons with postlingually acquired profound deafness were administered the ... Research Article
Research Article  |   November 01, 1990
The Relationship between Communication Problems and Psychological Difficulties in Persons with Profound Acquired Hearing Loss
 
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Article Information
Research Article   |   November 01, 1990
The Relationship between Communication Problems and Psychological Difficulties in Persons with Profound Acquired Hearing Loss
Journal of Speech and Hearing Disorders, November 1990, Vol. 55, 656-664. doi:10.1044/jshd.5504.656
History: Received July 10, 1989 , Accepted December 1, 1989
 
Journal of Speech and Hearing Disorders, November 1990, Vol. 55, 656-664. doi:10.1044/jshd.5504.656
History: Received July 10, 1989; Accepted December 1, 1989

Communication strategies, accommodations to deafness, and perceptions of the communication environment by profoundly deaf subjects were correlated with indices of psychosocial adjustment to determine whether accommodations to deafness could play a role in the presence of psychological difficulties among deaf persons. Persons with postlingually acquired profound deafness were administered the Communication Profile for the Hearing Impaired (CPHI) and several standardized tests of psychological functioning and adjustment. Inadequate communication strategies and poor accommodations to deafness reported on the CPHI were associated with depression, social introversion, loneliness, and social anxiety. Limited communication performance at home and with friends was related to both social introversion and the experience of loneliness; perceived attitudes and behaviors of others correlated with depression as well as loneliness. In general, the pattern of correlations obtained suggests that specific communication strategies and accommodations to deafness, rather than deafness per se, may contribute to the presence of some psychological difficulties in individuals.

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