Expressive Language Recovery in Severely Brain-Injured Children and Adolescents The spontaneous expressive language abilities of 9 severely brain-injured children and adolescents and their age-matched normal controls were examined seven times over a 12-month period following injury. Analysis of conversational language samples revealed a relatively stable pattern of language performance for the normal subjects over this time interval. The brain-injured ... Reports
Reports  |   August 01, 1990
Expressive Language Recovery in Severely Brain-Injured Children and Adolescents
 
Author Notes
Article Information
Reports   |   August 01, 1990
Expressive Language Recovery in Severely Brain-Injured Children and Adolescents
Journal of Speech and Hearing Disorders, August 1990, Vol. 55, 567-581. doi:10.1044/jshd.5503.567
History: Received October 31, 1989 , Accepted January 4, 1990
 
Journal of Speech and Hearing Disorders, August 1990, Vol. 55, 567-581. doi:10.1044/jshd.5503.567
History: Received October 31, 1989; Accepted January 4, 1990

The spontaneous expressive language abilities of 9 severely brain-injured children and adolescents and their age-matched normal controls were examined seven times over a 12-month period following injury. Analysis of conversational language samples revealed a relatively stable pattern of language performance for the normal subjects over this time interval. The brain-injured subjects, as a group, demonstrated improvement on the majority of measures, but only a few reached the level of their control subjects and interindividual variability was considerable. Results suggest that the prognosis for clinically significant improvement in severely brain-injured subjects is good; however, deficits in expressive skills remain apparent up to at least 12 months following injury.

Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire Journal of Speech and Hearing Disorders content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access