A Comparison of Habitual and Derived Optimal Voice Fundamental Frequency Values in Normal Young Adult Speakers The purpose of this study was to compare habitual (modal) and derived optimal pitch (fundamental frequency) values in 40 young adults. The individual habitual F0 values of 20 male and 20 female nonsmokers with normal larynges, normal voices, and no history of laryngeal pathology or formal vocal training were obtained ... Reports
Reports  |   August 01, 1990
A Comparison of Habitual and Derived Optimal Voice Fundamental Frequency Values in Normal Young Adult Speakers
 
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Article Information
Reports   |   August 01, 1990
A Comparison of Habitual and Derived Optimal Voice Fundamental Frequency Values in Normal Young Adult Speakers
Journal of Speech and Hearing Disorders, August 1990, Vol. 55, 476-484. doi:10.1044/jshd.5503.476
History: Received May 23, 1989 , Accepted November 8, 1989
 
Journal of Speech and Hearing Disorders, August 1990, Vol. 55, 476-484. doi:10.1044/jshd.5503.476
History: Received May 23, 1989; Accepted November 8, 1989

The purpose of this study was to compare habitual (modal) and derived optimal pitch (fundamental frequency) values in 40 young adults. The individual habitual F0 values of 20 male and 20 female nonsmokers with normal larynges, normal voices, and no history of laryngeal pathology or formal vocal training were obtained from high-quality recordings of spontaneous monologue, oral reading, and sustained phonation. Optimal fundamental frequency (F0) was derived from each individual's phonational range using the 25% Method (Fairbanks, 1960; Pronovost, 1942). Using correlative analyses, the predicted optimal F0 values that were derived were compared to habitual F0 values for the male and female speaker groups, and for specific vocal tasks used to identify habitual F0 (i.e., spontaneous monologue vs. oral reading vs. sustained phonation). Results indicate that habitual F0 was not consistent with derived optimal F0 values using the 25% Method; rather, habitual F0 in our normal adults occurred between 8% and 10% up the phonational range from basal F0. Clinical implications of these data and the related limitations associated with the concept of optimal pitch (F0) are discussed.

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