What is Stuttering? The most definitive evidence about any aspect of stuttering is that listeners are unable to judge unit-by-unit occurrences of it acceptably. This result has been replicated repeatedly in every decade for a half century. Nonetheless, for virtually all research and most clinical practice, stuttering has been defined perceptually as if ... Articles and Commentary
Articles and Commentary  |   August 01, 1990
What is Stuttering?
 
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Article Information
Articles and Commentary   |   August 01, 1990
What is Stuttering?
Journal of Speech and Hearing Disorders, August 1990, Vol. 55, 370-382. doi:10.1044/jshd.5503.370
History: Received September 2, 1988 , Accepted June 21, 1989
 
Journal of Speech and Hearing Disorders, August 1990, Vol. 55, 370-382. doi:10.1044/jshd.5503.370
History: Received September 2, 1988; Accepted June 21, 1989

The most definitive evidence about any aspect of stuttering is that listeners are unable to judge unit-by-unit occurrences of it acceptably. This result has been replicated repeatedly in every decade for a half century. Nonetheless, for virtually all research and most clinical practice, stuttering has been defined perceptually as if listeners could identify it accurately. Reasons for this state of affairs and its implications for therapy, theory, and research are analyzed. An alternative speech production definition with its implications is proposed. Further, a diagnostic method of validating authentic stuttering is described, as is an objective for fluency-skill therapy that reduces rather than reinforces avoidance behavior.

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