Parents' Use of Signing Exact English A Descriptive Analysis Research Article
Research Article  |   May 01, 1990
Parents' Use of Signing Exact English
 
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Article Information
Research Article   |   May 01, 1990
Parents' Use of Signing Exact English
Journal of Speech and Hearing Disorders, May 1990, Vol. 55, 327-338. doi:10.1044/jshd.5502.327
History: Received May 15, 1989 , Accepted August 23, 1989
 
Journal of Speech and Hearing Disorders, May 1990, Vol. 55, 327-338. doi:10.1044/jshd.5502.327
History: Received May 15, 1989; Accepted August 23, 1989

Parental use of simultaneous communication is advocated by many programs serving hearing-impaired students. The purpose of the present study was to describe in detail the input characteristics of five hearing parents, who were attempting to use one such system, Signing Exact English or SEE 2 (Gustason, Pfetzing, & Zawolkow, 1980). The parents were intermediate-level signers, motivated to use SEE 2. Voiced and signed segments from videotaped language samples were transcribed and coded for equivalence and other features of interest. Results were that parents' signed mean lengths of utterance (MLUs) were lower than those of their children although the majority of their sign utterances were syntactically intact. Structures categorized as complex in the Developmental Sentence Scoring procedure (Lee, 1974) and considered abstract in a semantic coding scheme (Lahey, 1988) were seldom used by the parents. Parents provided a narrow range of lexical items in their sign code. Results are discussed in terms of the type of input the parents are providing and the procedures used to identify priorities for parent education.

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