Acoustic Reflex Thresholds in Normal and Cochlear-Impaired Ears Effects of No-Response Rates on 90th Percentiles in a Large Sample Research Article
Research Article  |   May 01, 1990
Acoustic Reflex Thresholds in Normal and Cochlear-Impaired Ears
 
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Article Information
Research Article   |   May 01, 1990
Acoustic Reflex Thresholds in Normal and Cochlear-Impaired Ears
Journal of Speech and Hearing Disorders, May 1990, Vol. 55, 198-205. doi:10.1044/jshd.5502.198
History: Received December 27, 1988 , Accepted June 15, 1989
 
Journal of Speech and Hearing Disorders, May 1990, Vol. 55, 198-205. doi:10.1044/jshd.5502.198
History: Received December 27, 1988; Accepted June 15, 1989

Ninetieth percentile cutoffs for acoustic reflex thresholds (ARTs) were determined for a sample of 2,748 ears of 1,374 subjects with normal hearing and sensorineural loss of cochlear origin. All subjects had measurable hearing (≤110 dB HL, ANSI-1969) at all three activator frequencies (500, 1000, and 2000 Hz). Cutoff values including "no responses" ("absent" reflexes at 125 dB HL) were higher than those excluding no responses when hearing losses were greater than about 55 dB. The 90th percentiles including the effects of no responses identified ears with retrocochlear involvement for hearing losses as great as about 75 dB. For greater hearing losses at the activator frequency, the no-response rate for both cochlear and retrocochlear cases is too high to enable them to be differentiated by acoustic reflex thresholds. The 90th percentiles are derived at each activator frequency collapsed across ears. It is therefore necessary to determine the probabilities that normal or cochlear-impaired ears will have one, two, or three frequencies at which the ARTs exceed their respective 90th percentiles. It was found that among normal and cochlear-impaired ears, 12.2% have one ART elevated above the 90th percentile, but only 5.6% have two or three elevated ARTs. Clinical implications are discussed.

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