Clinical Studies in Psychogenic Stuttering of Adult Onset Twelve patients (6 men and 6 women), ages 21–79 years, who, as far as it could be determined from their case histories, began to stutter for the first time in adulthood were classified by examining physicians and speech-language pathologists as having psychogenic stuttering. The case histories of these patients were ... Research Article
Research Article  |   November 01, 1989
Clinical Studies in Psychogenic Stuttering of Adult Onset
 
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Article Information
Research Article   |   November 01, 1989
Clinical Studies in Psychogenic Stuttering of Adult Onset
Journal of Speech and Hearing Disorders, November 1989, Vol. 54, 634-646. doi:10.1044/jshd.5404.634
History: Received August 19, 1988 , Accepted March 3, 1989
 
Journal of Speech and Hearing Disorders, November 1989, Vol. 54, 634-646. doi:10.1044/jshd.5404.634
History: Received August 19, 1988; Accepted March 3, 1989

Twelve patients (6 men and 6 women), ages 21–79 years, who, as far as it could be determined from their case histories, began to stutter for the first time in adulthood were classified by examining physicians and speech-language pathologists as having psychogenic stuttering. The case histories of these patients were examined to determine the details of their speech and allied complaints, the course and duration of stuttering, and if any psychologically stressful events surrounded the onset and development of the disorder. Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory (MMPI) data on 10 of the 12 patients were analyzed independently. The main findings were (a) stuttering was the chief complaint of 11 patients; (b) all 12 patients had additional neurologic-like complaints that turned out to be nonorganic; (c) duration of stuttering from onset to examination ranged from 4 hr to 1.5 years; (d) the stuttering of most patients was variable in severity and returned to normal either spontaneously or as a result of speech therapy or psychotherapy; (e) psychologic stress was associated with the onset in 10 patients: the stress was chronic in 4 patients and acute in 6; (t) MMPI profiles of 9 of 1O patients were abnormal, with four profiles reflective of a conversion reaction; (g) differentiating neurologic from psychogenic stuttering and the need for interdisciplinary collaboration were essential in all 12 cases; and (h) speech therapy and psychotherapy are justified when psychogenic stuttering is diagnosed.

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