A Case of Superior Laryngeal Nerve Paresis and Psychogenic Dysphonia A psychogenic voice disorder co-occurred or evolved with the symptoms and signs of unilateral superior laryngeal nerve paresis. We speculated that the former was a manifestation of a musculoskeletal tension or conversion reaction disorder, whereas the latter was a sequela to a self-limiting inflammatory process. Voice therapy proved effective for ... Research Article
Research Article  |   November 01, 1989
A Case of Superior Laryngeal Nerve Paresis and Psychogenic Dysphonia
 
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Article Information
Research Article   |   November 01, 1989
A Case of Superior Laryngeal Nerve Paresis and Psychogenic Dysphonia
Journal of Speech and Hearing Disorders, November 1989, Vol. 54, 526-529. doi:10.1044/jshd.5404.526
History: Received July 5, 1988 , Accepted October 26, 1988
 
Journal of Speech and Hearing Disorders, November 1989, Vol. 54, 526-529. doi:10.1044/jshd.5404.526
History: Received July 5, 1988; Accepted October 26, 1988

A psychogenic voice disorder co-occurred or evolved with the symptoms and signs of unilateral superior laryngeal nerve paresis. We speculated that the former was a manifestation of a musculoskeletal tension or conversion reaction disorder, whereas the latter was a sequela to a self-limiting inflammatory process. Voice therapy proved effective for alleviating the psychogenic dysphonia after the signs of the neuropathy had resolved, whereas psychotherapy offered strategies for stress management. A multidisciplinary approach to this patient provided for differential diagnosis and efficacious treatment.

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