Maternal Question Use Predicts Later Language Development in Specific-Language-Disordered Children The present study used a longitudinal correlational design to test whether variation in mothers' use of information-seeking and confirmation questions predicts variation in auxiliary and copula development in a sample of specific-language-disordered children. The study's confirmatory approach provides a sound empirical basis to conclude that the results of the present ... Reports
Reports  |   August 01, 1989
Maternal Question Use Predicts Later Language Development in Specific-Language-Disordered Children
 
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Article Information
Reports   |   August 01, 1989
Maternal Question Use Predicts Later Language Development in Specific-Language-Disordered Children
Journal of Speech and Hearing Disorders, August 1989, Vol. 54, 347-355. doi:10.1044/jshd.5403.347
History: Received August 1, 1988 , Accepted September 9, 1988
 
Journal of Speech and Hearing Disorders, August 1989, Vol. 54, 347-355. doi:10.1044/jshd.5403.347
History: Received August 1, 1988; Accepted September 9, 1988

The present study used a longitudinal correlational design to test whether variation in mothers' use of information-seeking and confirmation questions predicts variation in auxiliary and copula development in a sample of specific-language-disordered children. The study's confirmatory approach provides a sound empirical basis to conclude that the results of the present study did not occur by chance. Post hoc analyses were carried out to clarify the explanation of the predictive relationships. The main finding of the study was that mothers of specific-language-disordered children who used proportionally more information-seeking questions had children who showed greater mastery of auxiliary use 12 months later.

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