Use of Abstracts, Orientations, and Codas Narration by Language-Disordered and Nondisordered Children In this study language-disordered and nondisordered children viewed a nonverbal film, wrote the story, and narrated it to language-disordered and nondisordered peers who were unfamiliar with the film. The narratives were analyzed for the use of abstracts, orientations (background information), and codas. Language-disordered children made fewer references to the orientation ... Reports
Reports  |   November 01, 1985
Use of Abstracts, Orientations, and Codas Narration by Language-Disordered and Nondisordered Children
 
Author Notes
Article Information
Reports   |   November 01, 1985
Use of Abstracts, Orientations, and Codas Narration by Language-Disordered and Nondisordered Children
Journal of Speech and Hearing Disorders, November 1985, Vol. 50, 361-371. doi:10.1044/jshd.5004.361
History: Received August 18, 1983 , Accepted August 5, 1985
 
Journal of Speech and Hearing Disorders, November 1985, Vol. 50, 361-371. doi:10.1044/jshd.5004.361
History: Received August 18, 1983; Accepted August 5, 1985

In this study language-disordered and nondisordered children viewed a nonverbal film, wrote the story, and narrated it to language-disordered and nondisordered peers who were unfamiliar with the film. The narratives were analyzed for the use of abstracts, orientations (background information), and codas. Language-disordered children made fewer references to the orientation clauses of props and activities than nondisordered children. Neither group modified their language in the areas examined to take into account the communicative status of their listeners. Therapeutic implications for the language-disordered children are presented as are suggestions for future research.

Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire Journal of Speech and Hearing Disorders content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access