Auditory Brainstem Responses in a Case of High-Frequency Conductive Hearing Loss Click-evoked auditory brainstem responses were measured in a patient with high-frequency conductive hearing loss. As is typical in cases of conductive hearing loss, Wave I latency was prolonged beyond normal limits. Interpeak latency differences were just below the lower limits of the normal range. The Wave V latency-intensity function, however ... Reports
Reports  |   November 01, 1985
Auditory Brainstem Responses in a Case of High-Frequency Conductive Hearing Loss
 
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Article Information
Reports   |   November 01, 1985
Auditory Brainstem Responses in a Case of High-Frequency Conductive Hearing Loss
Journal of Speech and Hearing Disorders, November 1985, Vol. 50, 346-350. doi:10.1044/jshd.5004.346
History: Received September 7, 1984 , Accepted July 24, 1985
 
Journal of Speech and Hearing Disorders, November 1985, Vol. 50, 346-350. doi:10.1044/jshd.5004.346
History: Received September 7, 1984; Accepted July 24, 1985

Click-evoked auditory brainstem responses were measured in a patient with high-frequency conductive hearing loss. As is typical in cases of conductive hearing loss, Wave I latency was prolonged beyond normal limits. Interpeak latency differences were just below the lower limits of the normal range. The Wave V latency-intensity function, however was abnormally steep. This pattern is explained by the hypothesis that the slope of the latency-intensity function is determined principally by the configuration of the hearing loss. In cases of high-frequency hearing loss (regardless of the etiology), the response may be dominated by more apical regions of the cochlea at lower intensities and thus have a longer latency.

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