Lexical Imitation and Acquisition in Language-Impaired Children This investigation examined the influence of unsolicited lexical imitation on the comprehension and on the production of novel words by language-impaired children. Subjects were 13 children (2:8–3:1) exhibiting specific language impairment who were presented with 16 unfamiliar words referring to unfamiliar objects or actions over 10 experimental sessions. Unsolicited imitations ... Research Article
Research Article  |   May 01, 1985
Lexical Imitation and Acquisition in Language-Impaired Children
 
Author Notes
Article Information
Research Article   |   May 01, 1985
Lexical Imitation and Acquisition in Language-Impaired Children
Journal of Speech and Hearing Disorders, May 1985, Vol. 50, 141-149. doi:10.1044/jshd.5002.141
History: Received January 11, 1984 , Accepted January 3, 1985
 
Journal of Speech and Hearing Disorders, May 1985, Vol. 50, 141-149. doi:10.1044/jshd.5002.141
History: Received January 11, 1984; Accepted January 3, 1985

This investigation examined the influence of unsolicited lexical imitation on the comprehension and on the production of novel words by language-impaired children. Subjects were 13 children (2:8–3:1) exhibiting specific language impairment who were presented with 16 unfamiliar words referring to unfamiliar objects or actions over 10 experimental sessions. Unsolicited imitations appeared to facilitate subsequent production of these words on a posttest. This effect was greatest when these words were also produced spontaneously prior to the posttest. Words that were produced imitatively and spontaneously also appeared more frequently in spontaneous usage than words that were only produced spontaneously. No relationship between such imitations and comprehension was observed. These findings suggest that unsolicited imitations benefit children's lexical acquisition primarily by providing them with additional opportunities to produce words that are in the process of being established in their expressive lexicons.

Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire Journal of Speech and Hearing Disorders content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access