Some Effects of FM-System Coupling on Hearing Aid Characteristics A variety of electroacoustic characteristics was measured on four hearing aids and then repeated with the hearing aids connected to two different FM systems via three coupling methods: direct input, neck loop, and silhouette inductor. The measurements included frequency response, harmonic distortion, noise levels, input-output functions, and FM receiver volume ... Research Article
Research Article  |   May 01, 1985
Some Effects of FM-System Coupling on Hearing Aid Characteristics
 
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Article Information
Research Article   |   May 01, 1985
Some Effects of FM-System Coupling on Hearing Aid Characteristics
Journal of Speech and Hearing Disorders, May 1985, Vol. 50, 132-141. doi:10.1044/jshd.5002.132
History: Received May 23, 1984 , Accepted December 31, 1984
 
Journal of Speech and Hearing Disorders, May 1985, Vol. 50, 132-141. doi:10.1044/jshd.5002.132
History: Received May 23, 1984; Accepted December 31, 1984

A variety of electroacoustic characteristics was measured on four hearing aids and then repeated with the hearing aids connected to two different FM systems via three coupling methods: direct input, neck loop, and silhouette inductor. The measurements included frequency response, harmonic distortion, noise levels, input-output functions, and FM receiver volume control wheel taper curves. Omnidirectional and directional FM microphones were compared in a classroom environment, and minor changes in hearing aid-silhouette coupling were investigated. Large differences were found in some frequency response comparisons, with no single coupling method providing consistently better agreement with the hearing aid alone response. With the exception of the silhouette inductor, distortion and noise levels were similar for the hearing aids and FM-hearing aid combinations. Differences in the input-output functions between the hearing aids and the FM systems were observed. Some FM-hearing aid combinations produced very nonlinear FM receiver volume control wheel taper curves. The output level of a broadband noise in a classroom was reduced when a directional FM microphone was compared to the omnidirectional version. The results indicate that it cannot be assumed that the electroacoustic characteristics of a personal hearing aid are preserved when it is connected to an FM system.

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