Multisensory Speech Perception by Profoundly Hearing-Impaired Children Four children in Study 1 (ages 5–7 years) and 4 children in Study 2 (ages 8–11 years) received unimodal (tactual) word recognition training with tactual speech perception aids. Two of the subjects in Study 1 were trained with a 2-channel device and 2 with a 16-channel aid. All of the ... Reports
Reports  |   February 01, 1989
Multisensory Speech Perception by Profoundly Hearing-Impaired Children
 
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Article Information
Reports   |   February 01, 1989
Multisensory Speech Perception by Profoundly Hearing-Impaired Children
Journal of Speech and Hearing Disorders, February 1989, Vol. 54, 57-67. doi:10.1044/jshd.5401.57
History: Received September 17, 1987 , Accepted February 9, 1988
 
Journal of Speech and Hearing Disorders, February 1989, Vol. 54, 57-67. doi:10.1044/jshd.5401.57
History: Received September 17, 1987; Accepted February 9, 1988

Four children in Study 1 (ages 5–7 years) and 4 children in Study 2 (ages 8–11 years) received unimodal (tactual) word recognition training with tactual speech perception aids. Two of the subjects in Study 1 were trained with a 2-channel device and 2 with a 16-channel aid. All of the subjects in Study 2 used a 16-channel aid. Following training, subjects were tested on a list containing equal numbers of trained words and of tactually new words in three conditions: (a) aided hearing alone (H), (b) taetual aid alone (TA), and (c) combined (TA + H). Results indicate that subjects performed significantly better in the combined condition on both trained and tactually new words, providing evidence for significant sensory integration following unimodal training.

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